What the Hell is a Chayote

chayotefarm.png

I spotted Chayote at the farmer’s market and thought what the hell is this. It looked like pear. I tossed one in my cart. In my kitchen, I looked at it and said, “What are you?” After a quick Google search, I quickly learned a chayote is “A mild squash, native to Mexico. Chayote is an edible plant belonging to the gourd family Cucurbitaceae, along with melons, cucumbers and squash. Globally it is known by other names including christophine cho-cho, pipinola, pear squash, vegetable pear, or choko” With all that said,  if you asked me, this little guy is a complete mind f-ck. It tastes like cucumber, but is also squashy. I think this should be named pickled cucumber. Have you tried this? How did you prepare it? Here’s my version

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons (1/4 stick) butter
  • 1 large chayote squash, cored, and cut into cubes
  • 2 tablespoon Herb Farm’s NW Pike Place Herbs
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 2  scallions , thinly sliced

Preparation: Melt butter in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat.  In a bowl  add chayote, herb farm,  scallion, and garlic Mix well then add to skillet. Sauté until chayote is crisp-tender, about 3 to 5 minutes.

chayote.png

Verdict: I would buy it again as it intrigues me

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13 Responses to What the Hell is a Chayote

  1. I’ve seen them and always wondered so thanks! 😊

    Liked by 1 person

  2. @vapor_sage says:

    Never tried sounds good though

    Like

  3. I came across chayote (christophene) in Barbados. My first trip there, my mom ordered a salad and we thought it was green apple. Until she took a bite. It was definitely intriguing.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. reviewsbyjc says:

    I have seen these before but had no clue how to use them in recipes, thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. jml297 says:

    Chayote are known as chokos in Australia and they used to be grown in many backyards and dished up with other vegetables at dinner time to supplement a meal. They tend to take on the flavour of whatever they are cooked with, and were added to savoury dishes such as stews and casseroles as well as stewing fruit to stretch it out a bit. Glad you have found a tasty way to serve up one of my least favourite childhood vegetables! Might be time for me to revisit them …

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Yes. I live in Barbados and they are very a very common home grown vine and vegetable which we call Christophene. We mostly steam then with other veg as a side dish. It is most used as a.medicine though for lowering high blood pressure. It has a very high water content. I love them. Oh ppl also top them with cheese as a casserole.

    Liked by 1 person

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