Mindfulness for People of Color

Can you say more about mindfulness as a tool for people of color?

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We know that deep relaxation is important for healing, but how do we replenish ourselves? And rest? When you poll Black women, you find that we don’t rest well. Remember, we were brought here to work! I recently said to someone, “I have been tired for years.” Mindfulness helps us to rest—to stop, sit, connect with our breath, close our eyes, drop our gaze, sit upright but relaxed, be still. That’s what mindfulness gives us—a chance to get quiet and see what’s there and to hold it kindly. This is the exploration of being human.

For people of color, Black people in particular, our identity is constantly defined vis-à-vis white folks. Well, this quietness is putting an end to that: I am sovereign of myself. Who I am and how I define myself is not vis-à-vis white folks anymore.

This is also a YouToo movement. The same way that I’m tapping into courage, white people can tap into courage and end this hollow compassion that shows up when they see Black pain, so they can go deeper and make some decisions about how they engage in a truly more meaningful way. – Jenee Johnson

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2 Responses to Mindfulness for People of Color

  1. Sort of deep. I love it. But we as people period I believe need to practice more meditation. We just do and go. Go and do. It’s okay to sit still. To be quiet. To say No. I learned this in 2017. I’m perfectly fine now sitting in my house doing absolutely NOTHING. Thanks for this.

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  2. msw blog says:

    I agree we as a people period need to practice mindfulness, but particular people of color as it is a concept that is foreign to those who only knows “The do and go mindset”. Jenee Johnson is an amazing woman who has giving voice to developing a new way to talk about trauma, race, and bias. I think you would enjoy the full interview below.
    https://www.mindful.org/encouraging-meaningful-conversations-about-race-and-trauma/

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